Make Your Next Four Years in College a Success

First-year college students are beginning to settle in. We wish you the best of luck on your college career. But, we also want you to be a wise scholar! Today, a college degree is not all that is needed for a successful future. You next four years in college should be a time of study and learning, but you should consider more.

Here is some advice for college students to use their time as best they can:
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Can You Appeal for Financial Aid?

April brings that time of year for taxes and sorting out financial aid offers. In the financial aid process, the question is: Are all financial aid packages written in stone, or can they be appealed for more money?

The answer is YES, you can appeal, but with caveats. What is definitely true is half or more of families that appeal financial aid offers do get more money, and that includes families earning an annual income of $100,000 or more. Colleges want enrollment; they are in business. And, they know if a family appeals the financial aid package, the more likely their student is to enroll.

So when can you appeal—every time? Not exactly. There are three circumstance when a financial aid appeals will be most appealing.
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Are You Sure You Want to Go to this College?

It’s been a while since you put your college application list together. Now it’s spring, and you are waiting for and receiving your acceptances. It is the time to decide if where you may actually attend college is the same as the top choice(s) you had last fall. Your choice may have changed!

Here are some things to ask yourself to make sure you know if your first college choice(s) is right for you.
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April Vacation Could Help You Make Your Final College Decision

Have you been admitted to college already? Whether you have one or seven admission letters, choosing the college you want to end up at is a hard decision. Things look different in the spring than they did in the fall, and your needs may have changed now that you’ve had time to think about it.

Why not use your up-coming April vacation to help you with your decision? This might be the best time to visit, or revisit, the campuses you are considering attending. Here are some ideas to consider so just such a visit could help you make your choice.
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Choosing Your Higher Education

If you’re looking for a career that has degree or certification requirements, it can be difficult to know the best option for education. Between traditional universities, online programs, and vocational schools, there are a lot of choices. Here are some of the things you’ll want to consider with each.
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How You Can Demonstrate Interest in Your Favorite College Choice

Colleges do keep track of interest demonstrated by students who are applying to their school. They wants students who will accept their admission offer so they weigh students’ interest as part of their admission process.

Here are some ways to show a school you want to go there and also increase your chances for admission.
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Have You Heard? SATs are Changing!

Why?

One reason is the ACT is becoming more popular. Also, the SAT is considered to predict college success with less accuracy than high school grades, and the SAT has been less and less connected to what is being studied by students in high school.

Another reason for the change is to reign in the test prep industry. There is a perceived inequality among students taking the exam. Those who can afford test prep may have an edge over those who cannot afford test prep courses. There will be more emphasis, for this reason, on making the test less about strategy and more about knowledge. For example, instead of guessing a correct answer, students will be asked to find the text in a reading passage that supports the correct answer.
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How to Get the Best Information on a College Tour

How to Get the Best Information on a College Tour

It’s getting close to spring, and this is a great time of year for juniors to start looking at campuses they are thinking of applying to in the fall. College tours give a student the chance to see and get the feel of a college. You can also get a sense of the travel it will entail to and from the college. On college tours you will get a chance to meet students and faculty and attend classes. You might even stay in a dorm overnight and get a sense of the recreation on campus. College tours also offer a time for you to ask questions, and to so of real students. FAQs on websites and in pamphlets are too general. Now is the time you get a chance to ask about your particular interests and concerns.

Here are some general questions to ask that you might not think of but which are important to you:
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What to Do if Your SAT Scores are Bad

If your SAT scores are not as high as you wanted them to be, don’t panic. You can still get into a good college. In fact, you can even still apply to your dream school.

Here is some good advice for those of you who did not ace the SAT.

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What Determines Your Financial Aid Package?

A full ride to college and the sky’s the limit? Is that what you are thinking when you apply to a high-priced college and seek financial aid? The reality is that less than 3% of colleges provide enough financial aid to cover all the costs of college, and even then that happens only if you are a US citizen and met the school’s financial aid deadline.

How is a student’s financial aid package figured? A college always starts with the information on the student’s Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Private schools also use information from another financial aid application, the College Board’s CSS/Financial Aid Profile. The information on these two applications is used by each college to calculate, each with different formulas, what the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is. When the EFC is subtracted from the cost of the college—which includes room, board, books, travel, and miscellaneous expenses–you are left with the student’s need.
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Are College Students Studying Less?

In 1961 the average full-time college student worked 40 hours per week on academic work. The 40 hours included class time as well as hours studying.

By 2003 that figure had been reduced to 27 hours per week of class and study time. Why?
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