Make Your Next Four Years in College a Success

First-year college students are beginning to settle in. We wish you the best of luck on your college career. But, we also want you to be a wise scholar! Today, a college degree is not all that is needed for a successful future. You next four years in college should be a time of study and learning, but you should consider more.

Here is some advice for college students to use their time as best they can:
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Making Your Activity Essay Come Alive

The activity essay may be the most difficult essay you write.  Although it is no longer required as part of the Common App, it still may appear as a college specific essay. It is usually short, so you must choose your points and budget your words carefully; it must engage the reader quickly; and it must tell a part of your “story” succinctly. Here are a few pointers to give life and uniqueness to this essay.
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Tips for Repaying Your Student Loans

One quarter to one third of recent college graduates who took out students loans to finance their college education are late paying their first student loan bill. 35% of people under 30 are 90 or more days delinquent. After 270 days of non-payment, you are considered in default on your loan. All of this can result in damage to credit scores that can affect graduates for life.

The reason is not usually irresponsibility but the inability of those who are indebted to understand the whole process of repaying their loans, a very complicated business. Students who have borrowed monies for their education should know three things:
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Dual Enrollment Courses for the College-bound

Dual Enrollment allows students in their last two years of high school to enroll for college credit at a local college or university. This program extends the opportunity for lower income students or minority students to get a head start toward college. It also allows college applicants looking to get into a more selective college get on the fast track to their goals.

Dual enrollment, then, can make your high school resume look even better and demonstrate your ability to do college work. It can also help students get a sense of what to expect in college, give them more familiarity with college culture, and save them money on their college degree. In fact, the dual enrollment programs are often designed to keep the cost of a baccalaureate degree under $10,000.
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A New Take on SAT Subject Tests

Fewer than 50 colleges require scores from the SAT subject tests for undergraduate admission. Those that do are among the more selective colleges.

Harvard has now announced it will no longer require scores form subject tests (May, 2014).
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What College Are You Looking For?

Colleges want to know their markets, and academic research tells them there are six types of college students they must appeal to.

Perhaps if you know which type of college student you are, it will help you choose which college will best appeal to you. Here are the six types of college students:
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Going Off to College the Right Way

Nervous about starting college? Of course! You should know right now that Student Affairs people at the college are working hard to make your transition from high school to college easier for you, but there are always glitches and problems. Knowing what to expect is half the battle. Here is some information about what you might find transitioning to college so you can either avoid problems, plan for them, or do something about them.
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Why College Students Should Consider Playing on a Sports Team

You go to college to prepare yourself for success. But, what if that success is not only based on your academic program and the grades you earn?

A recent study shows employers value leadership skills of athletes graduating from college above other students, including debate team captains, resident assistants, and college newspaper editors. They especially value college graduates who held leadership positions in athletics. Top scorers are Division III captains of both men’s and women’s’ tennis teams.
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How College Admissions Calculate your High School GPA

An “A” (90 to 100) at Central High in Maryland doesn’t always mean the same thing as an “A” (93-100) at Memorial High School in Eureka, CA. And, maybe Memorial offers “A+s” and “A-s,” and Central doesn’t. In addition, it may be harder to earn an “A” with the teachers in Maryland than in CA. On top of all this, some high schools have weighted grades for certain courses. So how do grades get considered equally in colleges across the country?

Because one high school GPA does not equal another’s, colleges often use a general formula to make the playing field for applicants level. Whether your high school gives letter grades or numerical grades, a college will convert your grades to a 4.0 scale. Below is a tough conversion scale.

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Applying to Selective Colleges

The American teenage population is increasing. At the same time, colleges have expanded their markets to reach global students and have fewer slots for American Teenagers. What do these stats mean? It is harder and harder to get into American selective colleges today than ever, and not only because the college application pool has become more competitive.

But, there are ways to think about applying to colleges without starting off with a negative attitude. There are positives about the college world of application today, too.

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Special Interests Can Help You Get Into College…Sometimes!

Colleges take interest in applicants who have special talents, hobbies, and skills. These special qualities help an application stand out, help define your fit at a school, or fill a college’s need, all of which can boost your chances of being accepted.

A rural college may well like the idea an applicant has outdoor hobbies like white water rafting or bear hunting. Colleges with ice hockey teams need players who are skilled players and skaters. Musical hobbies and environmental interests may fit with a liberal arts college campus, as an interest in jellyfish might look great to a college with a strong program in marine studies.
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